Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience Jeanie Fox of Davie, Fla., and her husband were largely trapped in their house by a huge bee colony that took up residence in the walls of their house. A bee exterminator working pro bono got rid of the hive.
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Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

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Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

Woman Trapped By Bees Recounts Experience

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Jeanie Fox of Davie, Fla., and her husband were virtually trapped inside their home by a huge bee colony that took up residence in the walls of their house.

"It was pretty bad," Fox says. "We couldn't go in the backyard or vacuum the floor."

Fox tells NPR's Robert Siegel she approached a police officer who deemed the bees a health hazard and got a bee exterminator to work pro bono and get rid of the hive.

Inside, the exterminator found a 2-foot-long hive and between 30,000 and 50,000 bees, Fox says.

Fox has been bee-free for a day and has four jars of honey to show for it.