Pushing the Age Limits on Motherhood More women are having kids into their 40s, 50s and even 60s due to improvements in reproductive technology. The fastest-growing age group for new mothers is 40 to 44. Which raises the question, how old is too old to have a baby?
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Pushing the Age Limits on Motherhood

Pushing the Age Limits on Motherhood

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10189860/10189873" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More women are having kids into their 40s, 50s and even 60s due to improvements in reproductive technology. The fastest-growing age group for new mothers is 40 to 44. Which raises the question, how old is too old to have a baby? Guests talk about what life is like for older moms and dads, and what the different social, economic and emotional pressures are.

Guests:

Nancy London, author of Hot Flashes Warm Bottles: First-Time Mothers Over Forty

Lauren Young, personal business editor at BusinessWeek

Steven Toushin, a 57-year-old father of twin girls who has six kids and is in his second marriage

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