A Letter And A Correction A listener is disturbed by an interview with an author who said he pretended to be a medical student to inform his writing, and we make a correction about a story on a California inmate who is suing the state.
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A Letter And A Correction

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A Letter And A Correction

A Letter And A Correction

A Letter And A Correction

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A listener is disturbed by an interview with an author who said he pretended to be a medical student to inform his writing, and we make a correction about a story on a California inmate who is suing the state.

JACKI LYDEN, Host:

Now to our letters. Last week, I interviewed John Wray, author of the novel "Lowboy." The book's protagonist is a 16-year-old schizophrenic boy.

S: Did you feel like you might be in danger of crossing any lines, or was that just some kind of (unintelligible)?

M: I did. I was very concerned about that. And I wasn't sure about the ethics of even being there, to be honest, but I - essentially, I kept my interactions to a minimum. I was really just observing.

LYDEN: Finally, we have one correction from last week's program. We made a mistake in the introduction to our story about a California inmate who is suing that state. We incorrectly said that Ernesto Lira has been locked up in a Supermax prison for the last eight years. Actually, he's out of prison now.

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