Teens Often Struggle To Separate Love From Abuse Nearly one in five teenage girls say their boyfriend threatened violence or self-harm when presented with a break-up, according to a 2008 study on domestic violence among youth. Three individuals, including a father who lost his teenage daughter to an abusive boyfriend, share stories of survival and loss.
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Teens Often Struggle To Separate Love From Abuse

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Teens Often Struggle To Separate Love From Abuse

Teens Often Struggle To Separate Love From Abuse

Teens Often Struggle To Separate Love From Abuse

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Teens in love
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Nearly one in five teenage girls say their boyfriend threatened violence or self-harm when presented with a break-up, according to a 2008 study on domestic violence among youth.

Sarah Van Zanten, a 19-year-old who survived domestic violence; Drew Crecente, who lost his teenage daughter, Jennifer Ann, to an abusive boyfriend, and Sheryl Cates, of the National Domestic Violence Hotline and the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, share personal stories of survival and loss.