Pew Calls State Of American Journalism 'Bleak' The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism has released its annual report. The report found revenues and subscriptions are down, and the news is similarly bad across broadcast journalism. What does local media look like where you live, on TV, the radio, and in print?
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Pew Calls State Of American Journalism 'Bleak'

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Pew Calls State Of American Journalism 'Bleak'

Pew Calls State Of American Journalism 'Bleak'

Pew Calls State Of American Journalism 'Bleak'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101951256/101951253" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism has released its annual report. The report found revenues and subscriptions are down, and the news is similarly bad across broadcast journalism.

Tell us: What does local media look like where you live, on TV, the radio, and in print?

Guests:

John Temple, former editor, publisher, and president of the Rocky Mountain News.

Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism

Seattle Post-Intelligencer To Go Web Only

Seattle will be a one-newspaper town after Tuesday, when the 146-year-old Seattle Post-Intelligencer prints its last edition.

The P-I will continue to live on the Internet with a much smaller staff.

Parent company Hearst Corp. says it has failed to find a buyer for the newspaper, which it put up for sale in January after nine years of financial losses.

The end of the print edition leaves The Seattle Times as the only major daily in the city.

The announcement comes about two weeks after Denver's Rocky Mountain News published its final edition.