Pakistan Uneasy Over Obama's Plan Pakistan's President, Ali Asif Zardari, told a joint session of Parliament this weekend that Pakistan needs to fight the escalating violence for its own good — but the reaction from analysts and editorial writers has been mixed.
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Pakistan Uneasy Over Obama's Plan

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Pakistan Uneasy Over Obama's Plan

Pakistan Uneasy Over Obama's Plan

Pakistan Uneasy Over Obama's Plan

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This week President Obama took a firm stance on Pakistan's role in fighting Al Qaeda and the Taliban. The president basically told the nation's leaders to take the necessary actions to fight terrorist organizations using Pakistan as a sanctuary — or be held accountable.

Pakistan's President, Ali Asif Zardari, told a joint session of Parliament this weekend that Pakistan needs to fight the escalating violence for its own good — but the reaction from analysts and editorial writers has been mixed.

Host Liane Hansen speaks to NPR's Anne Garrels in Islamabad about Pakistan's reaction to the Obama administration's newly unveiled U.S. strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan.