Funnyman Mel Brooks What's more tasteless than turning the Spanish Inquisition into a lavish song-and-dance number? Try a Broadway musical saluting Adolf Hitler. These are the kinds of insane spectacles that have made Mel Brooks a titan of American comedy. This interview originally aired on July 30, 1991.
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Funnyman Mel Brooks

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Funnyman Mel Brooks

Funnyman Mel Brooks

Funnyman Mel Brooks

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Mel Brooks

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

What's more tasteless than turning the Spanish Inquisition into a lavish song-and-dance number? Try a Broadway musical saluting Adolf Hitler. These are the kinds of insane spectacles that have made Mel Brooks a titan of American comedy.

Brooks was a writer on Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows; he co-created the 2,000 Year Old Man with Carl Reiner, co-created the TV series Get Smart, and made films including Blazing Saddles, The Producers, History of the World, Part I and High Anxiety.

This interview originally aired on July 30, 1991.