Classical Music in Miami: Fast and Cheap The New World Symphony in Miami Beach, Fla., is offering three 20-minute concerts Friday for just $2.50 each. Howard Herring, president and CEO of the Symphony, discusses the concerts and the pricing.
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Classical Music in Miami: Fast and Cheap

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Classical Music in Miami: Fast and Cheap

Classical Music in Miami: Fast and Cheap

Classical Music in Miami: Fast and Cheap

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Hear the New World Symphony

The New World Symphony, conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas, from Tangazo: Music of Latin America

Aaron Copland's Danzon cubano

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Alberto Ginastera -- Danza del ballet "Estancia", op.8a

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This album is available for purchase from Arkiv Music.

If you're in Miami Beach with 20 minutes to spare, the New World Symphony has a proposal: a mini-concert for $2.50.

Howard Herring, the symphony's president, tells NPR's Melissa Block it is an attempt to win a new audience.

The program includes a Mozart Clarinet Quintet, followed by two works — Handel Passacaglia arranged by Halverson and the Bartok Contrast for clarinet, violin and piano — and a Brahms Clarinet Quintet.

Herring acknowledges that the economic downturn is only a part of the reason for the pricing.

"Our job is to find new ways to engage audiences, new ways to educate them, new ways to bring them inside the music quickly and we hope, over the long term, really turn them into music lovers," he says.