College Athletes' Success Not So Hot Off Court A new study finds big-time men's college basketball programs graduate their student-athletes at a much lower rate than women's teams. Researcher Richard Lapchick, director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, talks about men's versus women's graduation rates among NCAA tournament schools.
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College Athletes' Success Not So Hot Off Court

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College Athletes' Success Not So Hot Off Court

College Athletes' Success Not So Hot Off Court

College Athletes' Success Not So Hot Off Court

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A Look At NCAA Academic Success

The NCAA's Final Four gets winnowed Saturday to two.

A new study finds big-time men's college basketball programs graduate their student-athletes at a much lower rate than women's teams. Researcher Richard Lapchick, director of the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, talks about men's versus women's graduation rates among NCAA tournament schools.