Even The Magic Kingdom Can't Trick The Downturn The entertainment business is dealing with its own hardships in this recession. The Walt Disney Company announced it has cut 1,900 jobs at its U.S. theme parks. The cuts were part of a reorganization plan in which 1,200 people were laid off and the remaining 700 vacant positions won't be filled.
NPR logo

Even The Magic Kingdom Can't Trick The Downturn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102761482/102761507" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Even The Magic Kingdom Can't Trick The Downturn

Even The Magic Kingdom Can't Trick The Downturn

Even The Magic Kingdom Can't Trick The Downturn

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102761482/102761507" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

As we heard earlier in the show, the nation's manufacturing industry eliminated more than 160,000 jobs last month. The entertainment business is also dealing with hardships in this recession. The Walt Disney Company announced that it has cut 1,900 jobs at its U.S. theme parks. The cuts are part of a reorganization plan in which 1,200 people were laid off and the remaining 700 vacant positions will not be filled. Now, Mickey and Minnie Mouse are still around. Most of the people axed were executive and administrative staff, not cast members, the employees who interact with park visitors.

Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich was visiting Walt Disney World with his family late last week. The way things have been going for him, he could probably use a hug from Mickey.