Cities Rely On High-Tech Method To Stop Graffiti A new high-tech solution aims to make graffiti a thing of the past. Deputy Police Chief Manny Solano, who is using this new technology in Watsonville, Calif., says the technology is a small part of an investigation the department has been conducting for the past three months.
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Cities Rely On High-Tech Method To Stop Graffiti

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Cities Rely On High-Tech Method To Stop Graffiti

Cities Rely On High-Tech Method To Stop Graffiti

Cities Rely On High-Tech Method To Stop Graffiti

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/102887305/102887603" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A growing number of cities are using new technology to capture graffiti taggers. They are relying on a special sensor that can somehow detect the use of spray paint and immediately alert police to that location.

Deputy Police Chief Manny Solano, who is using this new technology in Watsonville, Calif., says the technology is a small part of an investigation the department has been conducting for the past three months.

"Overall, the result of the investigation ... was 38 arrests," he says. "We have over $53,000 that these individuals are responsible for and over 885 counts of vandalism."