Gas Prices: 'Relative Misery' Around the Globe Gas prices differ around the country because of things like state taxes. In some areas, U.S. gas prices are close to $4 a gallon. But they pale in comparison to what people of many other nations pay at the pump.
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Gas Prices: 'Relative Misery' Around the Globe

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Gas Prices: 'Relative Misery' Around the Globe

Gas Prices: 'Relative Misery' Around the Globe

Gas Prices: 'Relative Misery' Around the Globe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10372148/10372149" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With gas prices rising, drivers often get annoyed by price differences from state to state.

According to AAA, New Jersey is the only state selling gas for under $3 a gallon (as of Thursday morning). But in Illinois drivers are paying more than $3.50 a gallon.

It's a matter of "relative misery." If you live in Chicago and you think you've got it bad, just look at what they pay in Europe and Asia.

Even when you adjust for measurement differences, gas costs more, on average, in every European country than it does here.

In the U.K. and the Netherlands, drivers sometimes pay more than $8 a gallon.

Britons definitely should not look at prices in oil-producing countries.

In Saudia Arabia and Venezuela, it often costs less than $1 a gallon.

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