Your Letters: Health Care, Jewish Cooking, Prague Guest host Lynn Neary presents listener comments about health care costs, Jewish cooking and a musical postcard from Prague.
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Your Letters: Health Care, Jewish Cooking, Prague

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Your Letters: Health Care, Jewish Cooking, Prague

Your Letters: Health Care, Jewish Cooking, Prague

Your Letters: Health Care, Jewish Cooking, Prague

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Guest host Lynn Neary presents listener comments about health care costs, Jewish cooking and a musical postcard from Prague.

LYNN NEARY, host:

Time now for your comments. We received more than 100 about Joanne Silberner's piece on health care costs. She reported on a poll that found more than half of Americans said they trust an independent panel to make decisions on medical treatments, while only 42 percent would trust the government to do the same.

Eric Brewer(ph) of Rochester, New York posted this. As a practicing physician I can only smile when I hear people oppose national health care because they fear that their treatment will be determined by faceless government bureaucrats. Their treatment is currently determined by faceless insurance company bureaucrats.

The real situation is do you want decisions about your health care to be made by people who are concerned about effective and efficient provision of health care, or by people who are concerned about shareholder profit for the insurance companies?

And we heard this from Brooke Johnson(ph) of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Unfortunately I regret to say that our health care problems go far beyond the scope of insurance companies, welfare and our government. Until we as a society start to practice prevention, our problems will continue.

Fred Wasser's piece on Jewish cooking and the influence of Lizzie Black Kander's 1901 "Settlement Cookbook" brought back these memories for listener Ruth Kramer Ziony(ph) of Los Angeles, California.

Ms. RUTH KRAMER ZIONY: On Sunday afternoons my parents would argue over who got to make the dessert for dinner using my father's copy of the "Settlement Cookbook," which had been handed down along with the heirloom silver from his mother. There are copies now in my kitchen. The pages are loose and stained with the remnants of gingerbread and Apple Brown Betty. The recipes may no longer be stylish, but the memories endure.

NEARY: Several of you wrote about the Czech band Don Gonyea referred to in his audio postcard from Prague, where he heard this music coming from the stage while the audience waited to greet President Barack Obama.

(Soundbite of song, "Girl from the North Country")

DRUHA TRAVA (Band): (Singing in foreign language)

DON GONYEA: I had no idea who they were, but they were really good. Then I realized I knew the song. The opening act for President Obama in the Czech Republic was singing Bob Dylan.

(Soundbite of song, "Girl from the North Country")

Mr. BOB DYLAN (Musician): (Singing) If you're travelin' in the North Country fair…

NEARY: We can now report that Don heard the group Druha Trava. In fact, host Liane Hansen interviewed them for this show back in the year 2000. The group has toured the U.S. and will be back in the states this fall.

You can post comments on any story you hear on our Web site, npr.org. And send us email by clicking on the Contact Us link. You also can reach our producers and editors on Twitter at NPRWeekend, all one word.

(Soundbite of song, "Girl from the North Country")

DRUHA TRAVA (Band): (Singing in foreign language)

NEARY: This is NPR News.

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