U.S. & Forests Owen Bennett-Jones reports from Geneva that the United States stands accused of dragging its feet on an agreement to safeguard the future of the world's forests. Nearly every country attending a conference in Geneva, sponsored by the United Nations, agrees that forests that have been logged must be replanted with native species. The consensus breaks down over a call for the formal agreement or convention.
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U.S. & Forests

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U.S. & Forests

U.S. & Forests

U.S. & Forests

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Owen Bennett-Jones reports from Geneva that the United States stands accused of dragging its feet on an agreement to safeguard the future of the world's forests. Nearly every country attending a conference in Geneva, sponsored by the United Nations, agrees that forests that have been logged must be replanted with native species. The consensus breaks down over a call for the formal agreement or convention.