Letters: Guns, May 4 Listeners respond to the story about a new law that allows people to take loaded guns into national parks and wildlife refugees and the significance of the date May 4, 2009. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read listeners' letters.
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Letters: Guns, May 4

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Letters: Guns, May 4

Letters: Guns, May 4

Letters: Guns, May 4

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  • Transcript

Listeners respond to the story about a new law that allows people to take loaded guns into national parks and wildlife refugees and the significance of the date May 4, 2009. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read listeners' letters.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Time now for your emails, and we start with a couple of corrections.

NORRIS: On Friday's show, we ran a story about a new law that allows people to take a loaded gun into a national park or wildlife refuge. Some of you may have heard us say that the measure takes effect in 90 days. It actually goes into effect in nine months.

BLOCK: And a correction to Bob Mondello's summer movie preview yesterday.

BOB MONDELLO: …and the lushly comic romance with food, "Julie & Julia," which stars Meryl Streep as Julia Childs…

(Soundbite of movie "Julie and Julia")

Ms. MERYL STREEP (Actress): (As Julia Child) Bon jour.

BLOCK: Oops. A few listeners with careful ears caught that Bob added an S to the name of that famous French chef.

NORRIS: We received many emails about our co-host Robert Siegel's talk with Derek Gottfrid of the New York Times Web site. He keeps track of the most-searched terms on the site.

BLOCK: Most of the top 10 made sense - Obama, China - but the second-most searched for term over a 24-hour period stumped Derek Gottfrid.

NORRIS: It's not a word or a phrase but a date, May 4th, 2009.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

So for reasons that shall remain mysterious, May 4th, 2009, was a point of curiosity with lots of people.

Mr. DEREK GOTTFRID (Senior Software Architect, New York Times): We would love to solve that mystery as well. If anyone can provide us some insight, please do.

BLOCK: Well, you offered a number of theories, including the suggestion that May 4th is a holiday of sorts.

(Soundbite of music)

BLOCK: Sy Sussman(ph) of Westlake Village, California, explains that it's an unofficial "Star Wars" holiday, and people were looking to see if there were related news stories in the New York Times.

NORRIS: And why May 4th to celebrate "Star Wars"? You ask. Sussman has the answer for that.

BLOCK: It is so "Star Wars" fans can greet each other with the phrase: May the fourth be with you.

(Soundbite of laughter)

NORRIS: To let us know of other holidays we may have neglected to recognize, please write to us. Go to npr.org, and click Contact Us at the top of the page.

(Soundbite of music)

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