Positive Life The HIV-AIDS epidemic is roughly 15 years old. Three thousand HIV-positive teens live in the United States -- the first generation who were born with the disease or acquired it in childhood. People with HIV once thought of the virus as a death sentence, but with new drug therapies, infected teens live longer and can plan a future. Despite these advances, they still carry the burden of a difficult and stigmatized disease. This documentary will focus on first-person stories told by teenagers as they confront the unique challenges of living with HIV, while struggling with the normal growing pains of adolescense. It is reported and produced by Stephen Smith of American Radio Works at Minnesota Public Radio.
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Positive Life

Only Available in Archive Formats.
Positive Life

Positive Life

Positive Life

Only Available in Archive Formats.

The HIV-AIDS epidemic is roughly 15 years old. Three thousand HIV-positive teens live in the United States — the first generation who were born with the disease or acquired it in childhood. People with HIV once thought of the virus as a death sentence, but with new drug therapies, infected teens live longer and can plan a future. Despite these advances, they still carry the burden of a difficult and stigmatized disease. This documentary will focus on first-person stories told by teenagers as they confront the unique challenges of living with HIV, while struggling with the normal growing pains of adolescense. It is reported and produced by Stephen Smith of American Radio Works at Minnesota Public Radio.