Worlds Of Bacteria, Alive On Your Skin Your body contains 10 times as many bacterial cells as it does human cells. A new study finds that healthy human skin hosts a remarkable diversity of bacteria ecosystems. Even skin as close as the inside and outside of your elbow contains distinct bacteria.
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Worlds Of Bacteria, Alive On Your Skin

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Worlds Of Bacteria, Alive On Your Skin

Worlds Of Bacteria, Alive On Your Skin

Worlds Of Bacteria, Alive On Your Skin

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104662183/104679735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This colorized micrograph shows clumps of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, or MRSA, magnified 2,390 times. Bacteria in the staphylococci genera are commonly found on the skin's surface. Jeff Hageman, M.H.S./CDC hide caption

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Jeff Hageman, M.H.S./CDC

Using bacterial DNA analysis, the scientists sampled bacteria found on healthy human skin at 20 different spots on the body. Click to see the different kinds they found. Julie Segre hide caption

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Julie Segre

Using bacterial DNA analysis, the scientists sampled bacteria found on healthy human skin at 20 different spots on the body.

Julie Segre