Return to Fort Carson Raises More Questions Six months ago, Daniel Zwerdling reported that officers at Colorado's Fort Carson were mistreating soldiers who returned from war with post-traumatic stress disorder. The stories prompted investigations and commanders at the base launched a training program to help every soldier in trouble. Zwerdling reflects on his recent return to Fort Carson.
NPR logo

Return to Fort Carson Raises More Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10470048/10470049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Return to Fort Carson Raises More Questions

Return to Fort Carson Raises More Questions

Return to Fort Carson Raises More Questions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10470048/10470049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Six months ago, Daniel Zwerdling reported that officers at Colorado's Fort Carson were mistreating soldiers who returned from war with post-traumatic stress disorder. The stories prompted investigations and commanders at the base launched a training program to help every soldier in trouble. Zwerdling reflects on his recent return to Fort Carson.

Gaps in Mental Care Persist for Fort Carson Soldiers

Hear Part Two of the Report

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10374760/10395102" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

IN DEPTH

Corey Davis was a machine gunner in Iraq; he was featured in NPR's December 2006 investigation on mental health care at Fort Carson. He told NPR that he began "freaking out" after he returned to the base; when he sought help at the base hospital one day, he says he was told he'd have to wait more than a month to be seen. Daniel Zwerdling, NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Mixon: Army Will Take 'Disciplinary Action' Against Leaders Who Show Bias Against Mentally Anguished Soldiers

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10374760/10382746" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Command Sgt. Maj. Terrance McWilliams at Fort Carson says he has verbally reprimanded a few supervisors for their treatment of soldiers with mental health issues. Daniel Zwerdling, NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Zwerdling, NPR

Williams: Soldiers' War Experiences Can't Be 'Justification for Breaking Law'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10374760/10382748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">