Letters: Saberi, Dylan Listeners respond to Melissa Block's interview with freelance journalist Roxana Saberi. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read some of the comments on that and the celebration of Bob Dylan in a small Indian town.
NPR logo

Letters: Saberi, Dylan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104730830/104730811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Letters: Saberi, Dylan

Letters: Saberi, Dylan

Letters: Saberi, Dylan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/104730830/104730811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Listeners respond to Melissa Block's interview with freelance journalist Roxana Saberi. Melissa Block and Michele Norris read some of the comments on that and the celebration of Bob Dylan in a small Indian town.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Time now for your feedback, and we got a lot of comments about my interview yesterday with journalist Roxana Saberi. She was imprisoned in Iran back in January, accused of spying.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

In that interview, Saberi addressed several accusations against her, including that she had in her possession a document about the U.S. invasion of Iraq that she had copied while working at an Iranian governmental think tank and that she'd had conversations with a man who worked for the CIA in Iran, accusations that were disclosed by one of her defense attorneys.

Ms. ROXANA SABERI (Journalist): He may have been referring to the false confession I made. But my confession was false, and I thought I had to fabricate it to save myself.

BLOCK: So the name, I mean, there's a fair amount of specificity in what he is saying here, this name, Mr. Peterson, invented out of whole cloth? Was this part of the government evidence, and you're now saying it's absolutely not true?

Ms. SABERI: I don't really want to say any more about this person because it was completely false, and I recanted it before my first trial.

NORRIS: We received many passionate responses to this interview, especially on our Web site. Quite a few listeners were skeptical that Saberi was telling the whole truth about what she did or didn't do to get in trouble with Iranian authorities.

BLOCK: Kevin Cronin(ph) wrote this: the biggest part of me feels good about her release, and part finds her evasive. The part that brings me personal discomfort is there's a small voice that says in some ways, she deserved this. It's the old story of placing your hand on a hot stove and getting burned then placing blame on the stove. Is that not the stove's nature?

NORRIS: Maria Sanchez(ph) was just glad that Saberi is now free. She posted: thanks for your interview with Roxana. I've been following her story with much interest, and her freedom has been in my thoughts and prayers. Now that she is free, we need to work for the freedom of so many other Iranians that are wrongfully imprisoned and are at the mercy of the cruel government of the Islamic Republic of Iran.

BLOCK: Finally, to another of our stories, this one from India about a familiar musician.

(Soundbite of song, "Buckets of Rain")

Mr. LOU MAJAW (Singer): (Singing) Buckets of rain, buckets of tears, got them buckets coming out of my ears, buckets of moonbeams in my hand.

BLOCK: In that story, we heard about Lou Majaw, who has celebrated Bob Dylan's birthday in the town of Shillong, India, for 38 years. Our reporter, Philip Reeves, attended the party for Dylan's 68th birthday.

NORRIS: Ed Rhodes(ph) of Baltimore didn't want the story to end. He writes this: how charming. What wonderful voices. The story ended with a question to Lou Majaw, the celebration's organizer, would you like him to come here one year? Maybe Bob Dylan hasn't been there in person, but from the passion in the story, Dylan certainly is already there.

BLOCK: Please send us your thoughts about what you hear. You can write to us by going to npr.org and clicking on contact us.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.