Study Says Fingerprints Aren't For Friction New research in The Journal of Experimental Biology shows that — contrary to conventional wisdom — fingerprints don't increase the friction between the fingertips and the grasped object. Biomechanics researcher A. Roland Ennos explains what fingerprints might actually be for.
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Study Says Fingerprints Aren't For Friction

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Study Says Fingerprints Aren't For Friction

Study Says Fingerprints Aren't For Friction

Study Says Fingerprints Aren't For Friction

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/105310429/105310409" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New research in The Journal of Experimental Biology shows that — contrary to conventional wisdom — fingerprints don't increase the friction between the fingertips and the grasped object. Biomechanics researcher A. Roland Ennos explains what fingerprints might actually be for.