Boston's Approach To Fighting Crime GUESTS: MAYOR THOMAS MENINO *Mayor of Boston PAUL EVANS *Boston Police Commissioner REV. JEFFREY L. BROWN *One of the founders of the 10 point Coalition (group of ministers and laypeople who came together to stop violence among urban youths) DEBORAH RAMIREZ *Law Professor, Northeastern School Law School in Boston *Works with the Dept. of Justice on community policing *Former federal proecutor Boston's crime rate has dropped dramatically in the 1990s. Last year, 16 young people were killed by guns compared to 51 in 1990. So what is Boston doing right? They've created the "Boston Strategy," a law and order program involving just about everyone: police, prosecutors, the courts, social workers, clergy and, most importantly, the community. The "strategy" brings the community groups together with city, state and federal agencies. They crack down on illicit gun traffickers while sitting down with suspected gang leaders to tell them the heat is coming if they don't stop the violence. Ray Suarez and guests will look at the "Boston Strategy" for fighting crime and ask if it can serve as a model for other cities across the country.
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Boston's Approach To Fighting Crime

Only Available in Archive Formats.
Boston's Approach To Fighting Crime

Boston's Approach To Fighting Crime

Boston's Approach To Fighting Crime

Only Available in Archive Formats.

GUESTS: MAYOR THOMAS MENINO *Mayor of Boston PAUL EVANS *Boston Police Commissioner REV. JEFFREY L. BROWN *One of the founders of the 10 point Coalition (group of ministers and laypeople who came together to stop violence among urban youths) DEBORAH RAMIREZ *Law Professor, Northeastern School Law School in Boston *Works with the Dept. of Justice on community policing *Former federal proecutor Boston's crime rate has dropped dramatically in the 1990s. Last year, 16 young people were killed by guns compared to 51 in 1990. So what is Boston doing right? They've created the "Boston Strategy," a law and order program involving just about everyone: police, prosecutors, the courts, social workers, clergy and, most importantly, the community. The "strategy" brings the community groups together with city, state and federal agencies. They crack down on illicit gun traffickers while sitting down with suspected gang leaders to tell them the heat is coming if they don't stop the violence. Ray Suarez and guests will look at the "Boston Strategy" for fighting crime and ask if it can serve as a model for other cities across the country.