Reviewing Science On The Big Screen From sci-fi to documentaries, good science films tell the human story behind scientific ideas. Which films get the science right, and which don't? Physicist and movie critic Sidney Perkowitz runs through some of this summer's top science flicks.
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Reviewing Science On The Big Screen

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Reviewing Science On The Big Screen

Reviewing Science On The Big Screen

Reviewing Science On The Big Screen

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From sci-fi to documentaries, good science films tell the human story behind scientific ideas. Which films get the science right, and which don't? Physicist and movie critic Sidney Perkowitz runs through some of this summer's top science flicks.

Guests:

Sidney Perkowitz, author, Hollywood Science: Movies, Science and the End of the World, professor of physics, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga.

Michael Tuts, U.S. operations program manager at CERN, professor of physics, Columbia University, New York, N.Y.

Paul Devlin, director, Blast!, New York, N.Y.

Mark Devlin, professor of astronomy and astrophysics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa.

Alex Rivera director, Sleep Dealer, New York, N.Y.