Bankruptcy Hearing For General Motors General Motors is back in court Tuesday. It's expected to ask a judge to approve a plan to create a healthy "new" GM — financed by the government. Under the plan, GM would be able to shed its bad assets. But the company still has legal challenges. It faces dealers who want compensation for their contracts being terminated.
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Bankruptcy Hearing For General Motors

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Bankruptcy Hearing For General Motors

Bankruptcy Hearing For General Motors

Bankruptcy Hearing For General Motors

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General Motors is back in court Tuesday. It's expected to ask a judge to approve a plan to create a healthy "new" GM — financed by the government. Under the plan, GM would be able to shed its bad assets. But the company still has legal challenges. It faces dealers who want compensation for their contracts being terminated.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with GM battling its way through bankruptcy.

(Soundbite of music)

General Motors is back in court this week. It's expected to ask a judge to approve a plan to create a healthy new GM financed by the government. Under the plan, GM would be able to shed its bad assets. But the company still has legal challenges.

It faces dealers who want compensation for their contracts being terminated. On Friday, GM conceded to a demand from several state attorneys general and consumer groups. It agreed that the new GM would accept legal responsibility for future lawsuits related to GM cars.

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