Vulture Consumers Gain From Others' Misfortune In the current economic slump, many consumers are finding bargains by low-balling salesmen or snapping up foreclosed homes. Reporter Jennifer Saranow weighs the ethics of "vulture consumerism" — benefiting from another's misfortune.
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Vulture Consumers Gain From Others' Misfortune

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Vulture Consumers Gain From Others' Misfortune

Vulture Consumers Gain From Others' Misfortune

Vulture Consumers Gain From Others' Misfortune

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106099937/106099921" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In the current economic slump, many consumers are finding bargains by low-balling salesmen or snapping up foreclosed homes.

Reporter Jennifer Saranow weighs the ethics of "vulture consumerism" — benefiting from another's misfortune. She wrote an article about it, "Trading Morals for Dollars in a Recession," for the Daily Beast.

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