False Signals Cause Misleading Brain Scans Images that show brain activity in vivid bursts of color may not be as clear as people think. Scientists say false signals and flawed statistics often make the results of fMRI studies murkier than they appear.
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False Signals Cause Misleading Brain Scans

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False Signals Cause Misleading Brain Scans

False Signals Cause Misleading Brain Scans

False Signals Cause Misleading Brain Scans

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This functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, of a brain shows activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Scientists gave brain scans to people who said they were in love, while showing them photographs either of their sweeties or other acquaintances, and found that the subjects' VTAs had increased activity when thinking about their loved one. New research says these images may be misleading. Lucy Brown/AP/Albert Einstein College of Medicine hide caption

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Lucy Brown/AP/Albert Einstein College of Medicine

This functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, of a brain shows activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Scientists gave brain scans to people who said they were in love, while showing them photographs either of their sweeties or other acquaintances, and found that the subjects' VTAs had increased activity when thinking about their loved one. New research says these images may be misleading.

Lucy Brown/AP/Albert Einstein College of Medicine

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