Astronomers See A New Class of Black Hole Scientists say X-ray data collected by the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton spacecraft show evidence of a new type of black hole in a galaxy about 290 million light years from Earth. Astronomer Sean Farrell explains what the discovery might tell us about galaxy evolution.
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Astronomers See A New Class of Black Hole

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Astronomers See A New Class of Black Hole

Astronomers See A New Class of Black Hole

Astronomers See A New Class of Black Hole

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106246271/106246266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Scientists say X-ray data collected by the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton spacecraft show evidence of a new type of black hole in a galaxy about 290 million light years from Earth. Astronomer Sean Farrell explains what the discovery might tell us about galaxy evolution.