Robert McNamara On Doubts, And Vietnam Former defense secretary Robert McNamara died Monday. In a 1995 interview with Terry Gross, McNamara reflects on Vietnam and admits his serious doubts about US policy and the decision-making that escalated the war.
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Robert McNamara On Doubts, And Vietnam

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Robert McNamara On Doubts, And Vietnam

Robert McNamara On Doubts, And Vietnam

Robert McNamara On Doubts, And Vietnam

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Former defense secretary Robert McNamara revealed his serious doubts about the Vietnam War in his 1995 book In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Former defense secretary Robert McNamara revealed his serious doubts about the Vietnam War in his 1995 book In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam.

Keystone/Getty Images

Former Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara, the man considered to be the architect of the Vietnam conflict, died Monday at the age of 93. He had been in failing health.

In a 1995 interview with Terry Gross, McNamara reflects on Vietnam and admits his serious doubts about US policy and the decision-making that escalated the war. He also talks about the behind-the-scenes decision-making policies that escalated the war.

The interview was recorded shortly after McNamara wrote In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam. The book contained the long awaited admission that McNamara believed U.S. policy in Vietnam was wrong and the war un-winnable.

This interview was originally broadcast April 25, 1995.