Google To Take On Microsoft's Operating System Google has announced it's launching its own computer operating system. The move is aimed squarely at Microsoft's core territory — the software that's used to run other computer applications. Google's Chrome operating system is due out next year.
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Google To Take On Microsoft's Operating System

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Google To Take On Microsoft's Operating System

Google To Take On Microsoft's Operating System

Google To Take On Microsoft's Operating System

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106376601/106376582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Google has announced it's launching its own computer operating system. The move is aimed squarely at Microsoft's core territory — the software that's used to run other computer applications. Google's Chrome operating system is due out next year.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with Google's latest assault on Microsoft.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: This battle between two big electronic companies focuses on computer software that you may use every single day without really thinking about it. Google has announced it's launching its own computer operating system. That's a move aimed at Microsoft's core territory, the software that's used to run other computer applications. Google's Chrome operating system is due out next year.

It'll initially be aimed at use in Netbooks, those tiny portable computers designed for Web browsing. There's no guarantee that Google will be able to chip away at Microsoft's dominance in the operating system markets, since others have tried and failed.

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