Science in the Courtroom From silicone breast implants to the O.J. Simpson murder trial, judges and juries are being asked to sift their way through some pretty sophisticated science--often presented by hired scientists who might lack objectivity. When juries get junk science is justice being served? In this hour, we'll take a look at the role of science in the courtroom. Guests: David Faigman Author, Legal Alchemy: The Use and Misuse of Science in the Law (1999, W.H. Freeman and Company) Professor of Law University of California-Hastings College of Law San Francisco, California Deborah Runkle Project Manager Court Appointed Scientific Experts Project American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, D.C. William Schwarzer Senior U.S. District Judge Northern District--California Professor of Law University of California-Hastings College of Law San Francisco, California
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Science in the Courtroom

Only Available in Archive Formats.
Science in the Courtroom

Science in the Courtroom

Science in the Courtroom

Only Available in Archive Formats.

From silicone breast implants to the O.J. Simpson murder trial, judges and juries are being asked to sift their way through some pretty sophisticated science—often presented by hired scientists who might lack objectivity. When juries get junk science is justice being served? In this hour, we'll take a look at the role of science in the courtroom. Guests: David Faigman Author, Legal Alchemy: The Use and Misuse of Science in the Law (1999, W.H. Freeman and Company) Professor of Law University of California-Hastings College of Law San Francisco, California Deborah Runkle Project Manager Court Appointed Scientific Experts Project American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, D.C. William Schwarzer Senior U.S. District Judge Northern District—California Professor of Law University of California-Hastings College of Law San Francisco, California