Shark Victim Wants Greater Protection — For Sharks Back in 2004, Debbie Salamone was wading waist deep in the water on the east coast of Florida when she was attacked by a shark. It tore at her foot, mangling tendons and her heel. But this past week, Salamone was on Capitol Hill with eight other shark attack survivors, lobbying their senators to help strengthen laws against shark finning.
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Shark Victim Wants Greater Protection — For Sharks

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Shark Victim Wants Greater Protection — For Sharks

Shark Victim Wants Greater Protection — For Sharks

Shark Victim Wants Greater Protection — For Sharks

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/106770509/106770493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Back in 2004, Debbie Salamone was wading waist deep in the water on the east coast of Florida when she was attacked by a shark. It tore at her foot, mangling tendons and her heel. But this past week, Salamone was on Capitol Hill with eight other shark attack survivors, lobbying their senators to help strengthen laws against shark finning.

Host Scott Simon talks with Salamone about why she wants to protect the animal that attacked her.