New Video-Saving Feature Raises New Rights Issues YouTube allows anyone to watch a video online by streaming it. New RealPlayer technology will let users keep a copy of the video on their hard drives. The big media companies are already sensitive about what shows up on YouTube, and this latest development could make them more nervous.
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New Video-Saving Feature Raises New Rights Issues

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New Video-Saving Feature Raises New Rights Issues

New Video-Saving Feature Raises New Rights Issues

New Video-Saving Feature Raises New Rights Issues

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10693480/10693481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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YouTube allows anyone to watch a video online by streaming it. New RealPlayer technology will let users keep a copy of the video on their hard drives. The big media companies are already sensitive about what shows up on YouTube, and this latest development could make them more nervous.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's business news starts with new technology for downloading video.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The success of YouTube continues to attract new partnerships, and that's where we begin on this Monday as we focus on technology. Later this month, Apple TV users will be able to access YouTube through a streaming set top box. And Real Networks has also announced the next version of its media player. There's a feature that could bring legal issues for YouTube and its parent company, Google. NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

LAURA SYDELL: Jason Schultz, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, says the other issue is that YouTube's service agreement prohibits users from downloading video.

JASON SCHULTZ: So this does raise a question of whether YouTube will claim that Real is helping people violate its terms of service.

SYDELL: Laura Sydell, NPR News, San Francisco.

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