Books To Lure The Gamer's Gaze Gamers are people, too. That's right, whether a child at heart or a real live one stuck in the gaze of flashing starships, cars or rock stars, they're able to do more than just click on and tune out. Yes, there's hope for game boys and girls, found in the ancient pleasures of books.
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Books To Lure The Gamer's Gaze

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Books To Lure The Gamer's Gaze

Books To Lure The Gamer's Gaze

Books To Lure The Gamer's Gaze

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Gamers are people, too. That's right, whether a child at heart or a real live one stuck in the gaze of flashing starships, cars or rock stars, they're able to do more than just click on and tune out. Yes, there's hope for game boys and girls, found in the ancient pleasures of books.

LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Someone close to you right now may be in a galaxy far, far away or rocking with musical dinosaurs from a past Stone Age. Sure, gamers plug in, turn on and zone out, but essayist David Kushner says despite their obsessions, there's still hope for them - in the pages of books.

DAVID KUSHNER: While a Nintendo DS won't replace Amazon's Kindle e-book reader, it marks a significant advance, just as Guitar Hero and Rock Band turned a new generation onto classic rock artists, like Rush and The Who, publishers and authors can now rethink how they reach this audience, too. Grand Theft Dickens may be coming your way soon.

HANSEN: David Kushner is a writer who covers digital culture. He's also the author of the book "Masters of Doom: The Story Behind the Video Games 'Quake' and 'Doom'."

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