Kevorkian's Release Rekindles Suicide Debate In a recent interview, euthanasia proponent Dr. Jack Kevorkian vowed he will no longer help people end their lives, even if they come to him in desperation. As the legalization of physician-assisted suicide comes up for a vote in the California legislature, guests discuss where Americans stand on the assisted-suicide debate.
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Kevorkian's Release Rekindles Suicide Debate

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Kevorkian's Release Rekindles Suicide Debate

Kevorkian's Release Rekindles Suicide Debate

Kevorkian's Release Rekindles Suicide Debate

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10735994/10735995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a recent interview, euthanasia proponent Dr. Jack Kevorkian vowed he will no longer help people end their lives, even if they come to him in desperation. As the legalization of physician assisted suicide comes up for a vote in the California legislature, guests explore how Americans feel about Dr. Kevorkian and the assisted suicide debate.

Dr. Linda Ganzini, professor of psychiatry and medicine, Oregon Health and Science University

Nancy Kelem, diagnosed with incurable colon cancer; advocate for California Assembly bill that would make it legal for doctors to prescribe lethal pills to terminally ill patients

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