Anti-Art School Makes Art Fun in Seattle Student artists are having some fun at an innovative art school in Seattle. At Dr. Sketchy's, students sit at a bar and sketch a burlesque performer, rather than the typical, serious model.
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Anti-Art School Makes Art Fun in Seattle

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Anti-Art School Makes Art Fun in Seattle

Anti-Art School Makes Art Fun in Seattle

Anti-Art School Makes Art Fun in Seattle

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"Miss Indigo Blue" poses at a Dr. Sketchy event in Seattle. Chris Blakeley hide caption

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Chris Blakeley

"Miss Indigo Blue" poses at a Dr. Sketchy event in Seattle.

Chris Blakeley

Who says learning art can't be fun? Why can't drawing naked people be sexy? Those were the questions that inspired an "anti-art school" event in Seattle called Dr. Sketchy.

A burlesque performer replaced the typical quiet, serious model. A bar replaced the classroom. Amateur and professional artists created their own life-drawing event. The idea began small, in Brooklyn, N.Y.; it has now become an international movement.