After Paris: Sentencing in America Under Scrutiny The recent case of Hollywood socialite Paris Hilton is renewing debates about criminal justice in America; the U.S. jails more of its residents than any other nation in the world. Marc Mauer of the Sentencing Project is joined by Jenni Gainsborough of Penal Reform International to discuss who should be locked up and why.
NPR logo

After Paris: Sentencing in America Under Scrutiny

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10932951/10932952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
After Paris: Sentencing in America Under Scrutiny

After Paris: Sentencing in America Under Scrutiny

After Paris: Sentencing in America Under Scrutiny

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/10932951/10932952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Paris Hilton is serving a 45-day sentence at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility in Los Angeles. ROBYN BECK/Staff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ROBYN BECK/Staff/AFP/Getty Images

Recent developments in the case of Hollywood socialite Paris Hilton is renewing debates about criminal justice in America; the U.S. jails more of its citizens than any other nation in the world.

The hotel heiress is being jailed at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility in Los Angeles for a parole violation related to a 2006 drunken driving offense. A public debate now ensues about the fairness of her 45-day sentence.

Marc Mauer of the Sentencing Project is joined by Jenni Gainsborough of Penal Reform International to discuss who should be locked-up and why.