The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic Director of the United Hosital Fund's Project on Family Caregiving in an Age of Change, Carole Levine. She brings her professional and personal life to bear on her work with the project. Since 1990, when her husband was critically injured in an automobile accident, she has been his caregiver. Levine new book which came out this week is called, Always on Call: When Illness Turns Families into Caregivers. Levine is also the founder and executive director of The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic. She was also awarded a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship for her work in AIDS policy and ethics. (Original Broadcast: 12/07/99).
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The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic

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<i>The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic</i>

The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic

The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111760/111760" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Director of the United Hosital Fund's Project on Family Caregiving in an Age of Change, Carole Levine. She brings her professional and personal life to bear on her work with the project. Since 1990, when her husband was critically injured in an automobile accident, she has been his caregiver. Levine new book which came out this week is called, Always on Call: When Illness Turns Families into Caregivers. Levine is also the founder and executive director of The Orphan Project: Families and Children in the HIV Epidemic. She was also awarded a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship for her work in AIDS policy and ethics. (Original Broadcast: 12/07/99).