'No Shoes' Rule Taken To Extreme At Burger King It seems a Burger King in St. Louis takes its no shoes, no service policy seriously. Workers recently asked a mother and her baby daughter to leave the restaurant because the child was barefoot. The mom tried to explain that her daughter was only six months old and does not own shoes. Burger King has apologized for giving them the boot.
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'No Shoes' Rule Taken To Extreme At Burger King

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'No Shoes' Rule Taken To Extreme At Burger King

'No Shoes' Rule Taken To Extreme At Burger King

'No Shoes' Rule Taken To Extreme At Burger King

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It seems a Burger King in St. Louis takes its no shoes, no service policy seriously. Workers recently asked a mother and her baby daughter to leave the restaurant because the child was barefoot. The mom tried to explain that her daughter was only six months old and does not own shoes. Burger King has apologized for giving them the boot.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

It seems a Burger King in St. Louis takes their no shoes, no service policy seriously. They recently asked a mother and her baby daughter to leave the restaurant because the child was barefoot. The mom tried to explain that her daughter was only six months old and does not own any shoes. Burger King has apologized for giving them the boot and has placed a side order of staff retraining.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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