Your Letters: St. Vincent Archabbey Host Liane Hansen reads about one listener's childhood memories of St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa., which Liane profiled last week.
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Your Letters: St. Vincent Archabbey

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Your Letters: St. Vincent Archabbey

Your Letters: St. Vincent Archabbey

Your Letters: St. Vincent Archabbey

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Host Liane Hansen reads about one listener's childhood memories of St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pa., which Liane profiled last week.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters. But first, we need to set the record straight on two stories from last week. Frank Browning's report on the Balagula, a theater in Lexington, Kentucky founded by a Ukrainian immigrant misidentified the writer of "Some Things You Need to Know Before the World Ends," a play that has been staged at the theater. The playwright is Larry Larson.

And in my conversation with 13-year-old Jackie Rodriguez, a softball pitcher from Texas, who's tossed 25 no-hitters, we misstated the number of no-hitters thrown by another Texas pitcher that prompted several notes like this from J.D. Smith of San Diego, California.

Nolan Ryan threw seven no-hitters, not six. Proper respect should be given to the one baseball record that will probably never be broken. We long-suffering Texas Rangers fans don't have much to crow about, but Ryan's no-hitters numbers six and seven were thrown in Ranger blue.

We received a slew of letters taking issue with our choice of local newspaper editors for a discussion on public reaction to the health care debate in Washington. Jean Freeman(ph) of Minneapolis writes: Why the selection of Cincinnati and Amarillo as the cities for newspaper editors to opine on readers' views of health care reform?

As the editors noted, Amarillo is strongly Republican and Cincinnati has been so until the last election. The choice of cities guaranteed the piece would focus on public concern about health care reform, ignoring large pockets of support.

And a number of you wrote to say you enjoyed my visit to St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. Here's Margie McMansky(ph) from Aurora, Colorado.

Ms. MARGIE MCMANSKY: I listened to your piece on St. Vincent Archabbey this morning with tears rolling down my cheeks. It brought back such a flood of memories.

In the late '50s and early '60s, we would visit my brother who attended St. Vincent's. We piled into our pink '57 Chevy station wagons and set out from Ralph, Pennsylvania. Running to see our big brother, visiting the museum with the miniature basilica and rattlesnake, attending vespers and smelling the incense wafting through the basilica, visiting the swans on the lake and waving goodbye to our beautiful brother, Peter. And then daddy letting us pull chunks out of our giant loaf of Bearcat Bread as we traveled back home.

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HANSEN: You too can share your adventures and comments. Go to the new npr.org and look for the listener comment section on every story. You can also reach us on Twitter. My username is NPRLiane. That's N-P-R-L-I-A-N-E. And the Twitter name for editors and producers is NPRWeekend.

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