Duo Of Brooks And Dunn Will Soon Be Done Brooks and Dunn's popularity is credited with helping to keep country music afloat at a time when the rest of the music industry was tanking. But now guitarist Kix Brooks and singer Ronnie Dunn will end an almost 20-year-long partnership — after a farewell tour.
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Duo Of Brooks And Dunn Will Soon Be Done

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Duo Of Brooks And Dunn Will Soon Be Done

Duo Of Brooks And Dunn Will Soon Be Done

Duo Of Brooks And Dunn Will Soon Be Done

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Members of the country duo Brooks and Dunn announced their decision to "call it a day" on their Web site Monday. It has been a long day: Guitarist Kix Brooks and singer Ronnie Dunn got together almost 20 years ago. And the sun hasn't quite set: Brooks and Dunn will release a greatest-hits album in September and embark on one final tour next year.

Ronnie Dunn and Kix Brooks onstage in Alabama earlier this summer. Rick Diamond/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Diamond/Getty Images

Ronnie Dunn and Kix Brooks onstage in Alabama earlier this summer.

Rick Diamond/Getty Images

On stage, the duo played raucous honky-tonk music, marked by Dunn's booming voice and Brooks' goofy antics. It was a money-making formula concocted in 1990 when a Nashville record executive put two struggling musicians together. The road was paved with platinum for almost two decades: more than 30 million record sales and more than 20 country hits, including "Boot Scootin' Boogie," "Brand New Man" and "Red Dirt Road."

They created thumping anthems: Their song "Only in America" was picked up by the Obama campaign, as it was by George W. Bush and John Kerry during their presidential campaigns.

Brooks and Dunn's popularity is credited with helping to keep country music afloat at a time when the rest of the music industry was tanking. But with country music sales now dropping, too, maybe Brooks and Dunn's decision to call it quits should come as no surprise.