Virginia School's No-Touching Rule Hits Nerve Virginia's overcrowded Kilmer Middle School adopted a zero-tolerance policy toward touching: No poking. No prodding. No hugging. A 13-year-old boy almost got detention for putting his arm around his girlfriend. His parents want the school board to review the rule.
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Virginia School's No-Touching Rule Hits Nerve

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Virginia School's No-Touching Rule Hits Nerve

Virginia School's No-Touching Rule Hits Nerve

Virginia School's No-Touching Rule Hits Nerve

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/11181177/11181178" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Virginia's overcrowded Kilmer Middle School adopted a zero-tolerance policy toward touching: No poking. No prodding. No hugging. A 13-year-old boy almost got detention for putting his arm around his girlfriend. His parents want the school board to review the rule.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

A Virginia middle school adopted a zero-tolerance policy towards touching. Kilmer Middle School is overcrowded. Physical contact leads to fights. So the school tells kids to keep their hands to themselves: No poking. No prodding. No hugging. A 13-year-old boy almost got detention for putting his arm around his girlfriend. His parents want the school board to review this rule. It is not clear if the board is willing to touch the issue.

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