Listeners Share Their Own Blissful Quotes In response to last week's segment about the book If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't More People Happy?, listeners posted their own favorite quotes on our Soapbox blog.
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Listeners Share Their Own Blissful Quotes

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Listeners Share Their Own Blissful Quotes

Listeners Share Their Own Blissful Quotes

Listeners Share Their Own Blissful Quotes

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In response to last week's segment about the book If Ignorance Is Bliss, Why Aren't More People Happy?, listeners posted their own favorite quotes on our Soapbox blog.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Last week we interviewed British comedy writers John Lloyd and John Mitchinson. They're the co-authors of a new anthology of quotations called "If Ignorance is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?" And I asked them: Why does the world need another book of quotations?

Mr. JOHN MITCHINSON (Co-Author, "If Ignorance is Bliss, Why Aren't There More Happy People?"): Well, there are so many available now, aren't there - and especially with the Internet.

HANSEN: So that's where we went to hear some of your favorite quotations - our blog at npr.org/soapbox. Here's a sampling.

(Soundbite of music)

HANSEN: Jan Freed(ph) of Los Angeles.

Mr. JAN FREED: If your dinner guest speaks at length about virtue, best count the silverware when he leaves, James Boswell from "The Life of Samuel Johnson."

HANSEN: From Normal, Illinois, Kathryn Tornquist.

Ms. KATHRYN TORNQUIST: The greatest gift we give ourselves and each other is the quality of our attention, from international author and teacher Richard Moss.

HANSEN: Next to Columbus, Ohio, and Darren Guarino(ph).

Mr. DARREN GUARINO: Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away, Philip K. Dick.

HANSEN: From Sam Hamburg(ph) of Chicago.

Mr. SAM HAMBURG: Everyone is entitled to a bad first job and a bad first marriage. And that's from me, Sam Hamburg.

HANSEN: From Meredith, New Hampshire we have Rheta Colin(ph).

Ms. RHETA COLIN: I have to work ahead so I don't get too far behind. That came from a 10th grade student of mine, who asked a month ahead of time for a copy of the next book we'd be reading in my English class.

HANSEN: Phillip Cleary of Augusta, Georgia.

Mr. PHILLIP CLEARY: Doesn't beauty exist by its own coming into being and disappearing? Japanese composer, Toru Takemitsu.

HANSEN: From Schodack Landing, New York, we have an entry from Robert Stone.

Mr. ROBERT STONE: We've heard that a million monkeys at a million keyboards could produce the complete works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the Internet, we know this is not true. Computer science professor, Robert Wilensky, UC Berkeley.

HANSEN: And Roxanne Herrick Cramer of Fairfax, Virginia.

Ms. ROXANNE HERRICK CRAMER: Most people my age are older than I am. And that is from me, Roxanne Herrick Cramer, 1957.

HANSEN: You'll find many more quotations on our blog, npr.org/soapbox.

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