Terminally Ill Study Host Bob Edwards talks with Dr. Nicholas Christakis, co-author of a University of Chicago study that found doctors frequently give terminally-ill patients an exaggerated estimate of how long they have left to live. The study, released yesterday, said a patient has less than a 40-percent chance of receiving an accurate prognosis.
NPR logo

Terminally Ill Study

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124598/124598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Terminally Ill Study

Terminally Ill Study

Terminally Ill Study

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124598/124598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Host Bob Edwards talks with Dr. Nicholas Christakis, co-author of a University of Chicago study that found doctors frequently give terminally-ill patients an exaggerated estimate of how long they have left to live. The study, released yesterday, said a patient has less than a 40-percent chance of receiving an accurate prognosis.