Samoa, France Traffic Changes Annoy Commuters On the Pacific island of Samoa, traffic will switch next week from the right side of the road to the left. Protesters took to the streets. Bus companies are stuck with passenger doors on the wrong side. In France, two feuding mayors have declared a busy street one way — in both directions. Now no one can take the road that used to carry thousands of commuters into Paris each day.
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Samoa, France Traffic Changes Annoy Commuters

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Samoa, France Traffic Changes Annoy Commuters

Samoa, France Traffic Changes Annoy Commuters

Samoa, France Traffic Changes Annoy Commuters

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On the Pacific island of Samoa, traffic will switch next week from the right side of the road to the left. Protesters took to the streets. Bus companies are stuck with passenger doors on the wrong side. In France, two feuding mayors have declared a busy street one way — in both directions. Now no one can take the road that used to carry thousands of commuters into Paris each day.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

Good morning, I'm Ari Shapiro with news of people whose commute is worse than yours. On the Pacific island of Samoa, traffic will switch next week from the right side of the road to the left. Thirty thousand people marched in protest, and bus companies are stuck with passenger doors on the wrong side.

In France, two feuding mayors have declared a busy street one way, in both directions. Now no one can take the road that used to carry thousands of commuters into Paris each day. It's MORNING EDITION.

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