New York City Sees Decline in Smoking A study from the New York City Health Department shows that smoking in the city has declined by nearly 20 percent since 2002. The drop is the steepest in the nation since 1965.
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New York City Sees Decline in Smoking

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New York City Sees Decline in Smoking

New York City Sees Decline in Smoking

New York City Sees Decline in Smoking

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New York City's health department ran print ads such as this one, which features a man who got throat cancer at age 39, in English and Spanish. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene hide caption

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New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

A study from the New York City Health Department shows that smoking in the city has declined by nearly 20 percent since 2002. The drop is the steepest in the nation since 1965.

The decline is being attributed to cigarette taxes, public smoking bans and a graphic anti-smoking advertising campaign featuring a former smoker who developed throat cancer at age 39.

Sarah Perl, assistant commissioner at the New York City Health Department's Bureau of Tobacco Control, talks with Madeleine Brand.