Obama Feels Pressure On Leaked McChrystal Report The latter-day Deep Throat who furnished The Washington Post's Bob Woodward with a copy of Gen. Stanley McChrystal's devastating report on the growing threat in Afghanistan clearly wanted to force President Obama's hand. Whoever leaked the report was obviously hoping to create pressure for reinforcements.
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Obama Feels Pressure On Leaked McChrystal Report

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Obama Feels Pressure On Leaked McChrystal Report

Obama Feels Pressure On Leaked McChrystal Report

Obama Feels Pressure On Leaked McChrystal Report

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Gen. Stanley McChrystal's leaked report says the U.S. cannot win in Afghanistan without more troops. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Gen. Stanley McChrystal's leaked report says the U.S. cannot win in Afghanistan without more troops.

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The latter-day Deep Throat who furnished The Washington Post's Bob Woodward with a copy of Gen. Stanley McChrystal's devastating report on the growing threat in Afghanistan clearly wanted to force President Obama's hand.

Because of security concerns, Woodward agreed to delay publication for a day and to excise sensitive passages. It was clearly a cooperative venture — the bearers of security secrets and those with an interest in spilling them.

I was reminded of a famous episode in 1975 when CIA Director William Colby called at my CBS office to request that I delay airing a story about an effort to raise a Soviet nuclear submarine from the ocean floor. I was released from my commitment when somebody else broke the story.

Whoever leaked the McChrystal report was clearly hoping to create pressure for reinforcements. The 66-page document, with its many warnings that the Afghan war was headed toward failure, had been drifting upward through channels for three weeks. On television, the president made a virtue of the delay, saying he would make no decision until he had absolute clarity about the course to pursue.

But the McChrystal report puts heavy emphasis on the time factor. Its conclusion is that without reinforcements, the war in Afghanistan would be headed toward failure and, within a year, defeating the insurgency would no longer be possible.

Indications are that McChrystal has substantial support from the ranks of the uniformed military. President Obama, feeling the heat, would undoubtedly love to know who leaked that sensitive report.