Job Hopper To Write About 50 Jobs, 50 States When college graduate Daniel Seddiqui couldn't find work with an economics degree, he hit the road. He decided to work 50 jobs in 50 states in 50 weeks. The 27-year-old completed his mission last Friday at a winery in California. Seddiqui says he won't be applying for another job anytime soon because he is writing a book about his working adventures.
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Job Hopper To Write About 50 Jobs, 50 States

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Job Hopper To Write About 50 Jobs, 50 States

Job Hopper To Write About 50 Jobs, 50 States

Job Hopper To Write About 50 Jobs, 50 States

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113265273/113265250" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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When college graduate Daniel Seddiqui couldn't find work with an economics degree, he hit the road. He decided to work 50 jobs in 50 states in 50 weeks. The 27-year-old completed his mission last Friday at a winery in California. Seddiqui says he won't be applying for another job anytime soon because he is writing a book about his working adventures.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And our last word in business today is job search.

It comes from Daniel Seddiqui. He graduated from the University of Southern California a few years ago with an economics degree, but no job. In fact, he had 40 job applications rejected.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

So, Mr. Seddiqui hit the road, hoping to work 50 jobs in 50 states in 50 weeks. He completed his mission last Friday at a winery in California.

Mr. DANIEL SEDDIQUI: You know, I'm trying to find jobs that depict the state's culture and economy.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Like a broker in insurance Connecticut, coal mining in West Virginia, and lobstering in Maine. His favorite job was as a dietitian in Mississippi.

Mr. SEDDIQUI: I chose that because it's the most obese state in the country, and would it just be a really fulfilling career just to change people's lives just by educating them how to eat right, be active, motivating them, because I think a lack of motivation has a lot to do with it, along with limited food sources in terms of everything's fried in the South.

INSKEEP: Mr. Seddiqui says he will not be applying for another job anytime soon, because the 27-year-old is writing a book about his working adventures.

That's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

MONTAGNE: And I'm Renee Montagne.

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