Malden Mills Jason Beaubien of member station WBUR reports that a company that became famous when it kept its employees on the payroll after a devastating fire has filed for bankruptcy protection. But fleece maker Malden Mills says the chapter 11 proceedings should return it to profitability. CEO Aaron Feuerstein says he has no regrets about keeping his workers at full salary while the Massachusetts plant was rebuilt.
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Malden Mills

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Malden Mills

Malden Mills

Malden Mills

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1134126/134126" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jason Beaubien of member station WBUR reports that a company that became famous when it kept its employees on the payroll after a devastating fire has filed for bankruptcy protection. But fleece maker Malden Mills says the chapter 11 proceedings should return it to profitability. CEO Aaron Feuerstein says he has no regrets about keeping his workers at full salary while the Massachusetts plant was rebuilt.