Gander, Newfoundland When four hijacked planes crashed on September 11, the airspace over the U.S. was closed and all planes in the air were ordered to the nearest airport. Dozens of aircraft ended up in Gander, Newfoundland, a small island off the eastern most point of Canada. Almost 7000 "guests" ended up there with no idea how long they would stay. NPR's Jackie Northam spoke with some of the residents of Gander and some of the passengers who ended up there. They tell a story of incredible hospitality, of makeshift housing and of friendships and bonds formed over five days until planes were again allowed to land in the U.S. (12:30) (please note: a promotional announcement for this story was corrected on air on Jan. 3, 2002:

"Finally, our promotional announcement of the Newfoundland story brought this correction from Mike Redpath, who teaches geography at the University of Manitoba. We said that flights were grounded in northern Canada.

"Mr. Redpath writes: 'Gander, Newfoundland, is at 48.95 degrees north latitude. Canada's southern latitude is 41.72 and its northernmost is 83.19. This means its mid-latitude is 62.45 degrees north. Everything south of 62.45 should correctly be referred to as southern Canada. Moreover, Gander is in the southern third of southern Canada.'"
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Gander, Newfoundland

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Gander, Newfoundland

Gander, Newfoundland

Gander, Newfoundland

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When four hijacked planes crashed on September 11, the airspace over the U.S. was closed and all planes in the air were ordered to the nearest airport. Dozens of aircraft ended up in Gander, Newfoundland, a small island off the eastern most point of Canada. Almost 7000 "guests" ended up there with no idea how long they would stay. NPR's Jackie Northam spoke with some of the residents of Gander and some of the passengers who ended up there. They tell a story of incredible hospitality, of makeshift housing and of friendships and bonds formed over five days until planes were again allowed to land in the U.S. (12:30) (please note: a promotional announcement for this story was corrected on air on Jan. 3, 2002:

"Finally, our promotional announcement of the Newfoundland story brought this correction from Mike Redpath, who teaches geography at the University of Manitoba. We said that flights were grounded in northern Canada.

"Mr. Redpath writes: 'Gander, Newfoundland, is at 48.95 degrees north latitude. Canada's southern latitude is 41.72 and its northernmost is 83.19. This means its mid-latitude is 62.45 degrees north. Everything south of 62.45 should correctly be referred to as southern Canada. Moreover, Gander is in the southern third of southern Canada.'"