Chinese Firm Aims To Make Hummers More Efficient A little-known Chinese machinery manufacturer has begun to seek regulatory approval for its purchase of the distressed Hummer brand from General Motors. It aims to close the deal by early next year. This is the first major foray by the Chinese into the struggling U.S. auto market. Sichuan Tengzhon Heavy Industrial Machinery hopes to turn Hummer into a more fuel efficient, environmentally friendly brand.
NPR logo

Chinese Firm Aims To Make Hummers More Efficient

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113724476/113724451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Chinese Firm Aims To Make Hummers More Efficient

Chinese Firm Aims To Make Hummers More Efficient

Chinese Firm Aims To Make Hummers More Efficient

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/113724476/113724451" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A little-known Chinese machinery manufacturer has begun to seek regulatory approval for its purchase of the distressed Hummer brand from General Motors. It aims to close the deal by early next year. This is the first major foray by the Chinese into the struggling U.S. auto market. Sichuan Tengzhon Heavy Industrial Machinery hopes to turn Hummer into a more fuel efficient, environmentally friendly brand.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with a buyer for Hummer.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: A little-known Chinese machinery manufacturer has begun to seek regulatory approval for its purchase of the distressed Hummer brand from General Motors. GM aims to close the deal by early next year. This is the first major foray by the Chinese into the struggling U.S. auto market. Sichuan Tengzhon Heavy Industrial Machinery hopes to turn Hummer into a more fuel efficient, environmentally friendly brand.

Hummer reportedly sold $150 million. That's less than a third of what GM had hoped to get. Initial reaction in China to the sale was negative. Some wondered why a company with no experience running a Western brand would want to buy a faltering brand known for gas guzzlers.

Copyright © 2009 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.