Yiddish Radio Project Independent Producer David Isay brings us the first installment of the Yiddish Radio Project, a 10-part series airing Tuesdays on All Things Considered. Today, we hear an introduction narrated by musician and social historian Henry Sapoznik. In 1985, Sapoznik quite literally tripped over a pile of old records in a New York City storage room. They were transcriptions of old Yiddish radio programs, broadcast in the 1930s and 1940s by small New York radio stations serving Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. Sapoznik was transfixed by what he heard on these discs, and he spent the next 17 years searching for other recordings.
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Yiddish Radio Project

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Yiddish Radio Project

Yiddish Radio Project

Yiddish Radio Project

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Independent Producer David Isay brings us the first installment of the Yiddish Radio Project, a 10-part series airing Tuesdays on All Things Considered. Today, we hear an introduction narrated by musician and social historian Henry Sapoznik. In 1985, Sapoznik quite literally tripped over a pile of old records in a New York City storage room. They were transcriptions of old Yiddish radio programs, broadcast in the 1930s and 1940s by small New York radio stations serving Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. Sapoznik was transfixed by what he heard on these discs, and he spent the next 17 years searching for other recordings.